CSIRO — Total Wellbeing Diet

Dietitian Karen Inge explains the CSIRO — Total Wellbeing Diet.

How does it work?
CSIRO research led to the development of this high protein/low-fat diet, which became a bestseller in Australia when it was released in 2005.

"It's not a no-carb diet," says Inge. "But the emphasis is on more protein and less carbohydrate. The quantity of meat is about 200 grams of raw weight of meat at dinner and another 100 grams of protein at lunch."

Pros

  • It's Australian and is based on research by the CSRIO, a highly respected organisation.
  • It's higher protein, which is designed to keep hunger satisfied.
  • It helps to provide nutrients that might be at risk on a restricted-kilojoule diet, such as iron, zinc and calcium.

Cons

  • There has been controversy over the amount of meat in the diet. "Some people, particularly women, will struggle with the amount of meat," says Inge.

Karen's verdict
It's filling and a lot of people will find this very satisfying and will probably do well on it. But it won't suit everyone.

Best for
"I think men will love this diet," says Inge. "They can have their meat and lose weight too."

Buy the CSIRO — Total Wellbeing Diet book now.


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