Jennifer Aniston's chefs reveal her body secrets

Friday, October 22, 2010

Have you ever wondered how Jennifer Aniston has managed to maintain her slender frame and killer pins for so long? In a new book she has written with two in-home chef sisters, Jewels and Jill Elmore, Jen has unveiled her daily food intake.

The book, titled The Family Chef, gives an insight into Jen's pre-diet food intake, which consisted of pre-packaged meals, overcooked takeaway and cheese.

Now the star sticks to a routine menu cooked by her chefs, with a lunch that has as few as 151 calories (634 kilojoules) — less than half the amount of kilojoules in your gourmet sandwich, the UK's Daily Mail reported.

"It's taken me time to learn that the key to having a great physique isn't to deprive oneself of food," she said.

Watch the video above to learn more of her secrets!

Here's a snippet of Jen's menu

Breakfast options

  • Whole-wheat toast with apple butter, a quarter cup of low-fat cottage cheese and a little homemade granola.
  • White peach and ginger smoothie made with coconut water.

Lunch options

  • Salad made with a little haloumi cheese, puy lentils, cucumbers and tomatoes.
  • Salad made with a quarter cup of white beans alongside fennel, tomatoes, flat-leaf parsley, dill and chive.s
  • Celery soup.

Dinner options

  • White fish dressed with a quarter cup of walnuts, beaten egg and Cajun seasoning, served over steamed green beans.
  • Marinated salmon (served with asparagus, chives and maitake). mushrooms
  • Chicken burrito. Cheese and sour cream are listed as 'optional additions'.

Could we all eat like Jen?
It all seems very tasty and doable, as long as you don't sneak in chocolate bars and chips, but is it sustainable? "Jennifer is right about the key to maintaining body weight being not about depriving yourself," Accredited Practising Dietitian and Director of Director of Mind Food Dietetics in Melbourne, Lisa Renn told Health & Wellbeing. "Whatever eating plan you choose you need to be able to keep it up for the long-term."

"Portion size is important as is choosing a variety of foods, putting yourself on a diet that leaves you feeling very hungry is not sustainable," Renn said.

Renn adds that Jen's diet could be improved with some simple additions.

"Adding in some fruit or low fat dairy as snacks between meals would improve the quality of this diet, being more inclusive of all food groups as well as giving you a plan for dealing with excessive hunger between meals, which is well known to lower your resistance to high fat snacks," she said.

Have your say: would you eat like Jen to get her body?


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